TO RESEARCH NYPPL POSTINGS type in your key word in the box at the upper left and tap enter.

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Arbitration award sustained absent proof that the award violates public policy, is irrational, or clearly exceeds a specifically enumerated limitation on the arbitrator's power

Arbitration award sustained absent proof that the award violates public policy, is irrational, or clearly exceeds a specifically enumerated limitation on the arbitrator's power
Shenendehowa Cent. Sch. Dist. Bd. of Educ. (Civil Serv. Empls. Assn., Inc., Local 1000, AFSCME, AFL-CIO, Local 864), 2013 NY Slip Op 00885, Court of Appeals

A school bus driver [Driver] tested positive for marijuana after submitting to a random drug test. This resulted in the School District's terminating Driver from the position, which action was ultimately submitted to arbitration.

The issue presented to the arbitrator: Did the termination of Driver violate the collective bargaining agreement between the parties and, if so, what is the appropriate remedy?

The arbitrator concluded that the School District had violated the agreement and that the penalty imposed on Driver, dismissal, was too severe. The arbitrator directed the School District to reinstate Driver without back pay, subject to certain conditions including an evaluation by a substance abuse professional and a negative drug test.*

The School District filed an CPLR Article 75 petition seeking to vacate that portion of the arbitration award directing that it reinstate Driver to the position of school bus driver and to modify the award by imposing the penalty of termination, contending that Driver had violated the School District’s “zero drug tolerance” policy.

Supreme Court granted the School District’s Article 75 petition seeking to vacate an arbitration award thus  reinstating the School District's decision to terminate Driver's employment with the district.

The Appellate Division vacated the Supreme Court’s ruling, finding that the award was not against public policy, was rational, and in making the award the arbitrator did not exceed his powers, holding that “Supreme Court should have confirmed the arbitration award.” The Appellate Division explained that “If a matter is submitted to arbitration, reviewing courts should not interpret substantive conditions of the agreement or delve into the merits of the dispute.”

Citing Matter of Grasso, 72 AD2d 1463 [Leave to appeal denied, 15 NY3d 703], the court said that "Courts must give deference to an arbitrator's decision and cannot examine the merits of an arbitration award, even if the arbitrator misapplied or misinterpreted the law or facts, but a court may vacate an award [where it] violates a strong public policy, is irrational or clearly exceeds a specifically enumerated limitation on the arbitrator's power."

Further, the Appellate Division stated that "[W]here an agreement is 'reasonably susceptible of the construction given it by the arbitrator, a court may not vacate the award," citing Matter of Albany County Sheriffs Local 775 of N.Y. State Law Enforcement Officers Union, Dist. Council 82, AFSCME, AFL-CIO [County of Albany], 27 AD3d 979.

The Court of Appeals agreed with the Appellate Division’s ruling, noting that it has recognized three narrow grounds that may form the basis for vacating an arbitrator's award, repeating the Appellate Division’s criteria that the award violates public policy, is irrational, or clearly exceeds a specifically enumerated limitation on the arbitrator's power, commenting that none of these grounds had been established by the School District in this action.**

Specifically the high court ruled that:

1. The arbitrator's decision did not exceed a specific limitation on his power; nor was it irrational.

2. Contrary to the School District's argument, the parties' agreement did not require the penalty of termination in these circumstances and

3. That the District did not in fact have a zero tolerance policy in place.

According, said the court, the arbitrator’s determination that Driver’s “reinstatement with conditions” was the appropriate penalty did not violate public policy. Although, said the court, “reasonable minds might disagree over what the proper penalty should have been [this] does not provide a basis for vacating the arbitral award or refashioning the penalty...."

Significantly the Court of Appeals noted that the arbitrator “determined that, contrary to the School District's argument, the parties' Taylor Law agreement did not require the penalty of termination in these circumstances and that the District did not in fact have a zero tolerance policy.” This suggests that had the Taylor Law agreement provided for termination in the event the employee tested positive for an unlawful drug or if the School District had a written "Zero Tolerance" drug policy known to Driver in place at the time Driver tested positive for an unlawful drug, the School District would have prevailed.

* The decision notes that “This effectively imposed, at that time, a six-month unpaid suspension” on Driver.

** Article 75 of the CPLR sets out other grounds, not relevant in this action, for a court's vacating an arbitration award.

The decision is posted on the Internet at:
http://www.courts.state.ny.us/reporter/3dseries/2013/2013_00885.htm

===============================


Electronic books [e-books] focusing on New York State and Municipal Public Personnel Law:


The Discipline Book, - a concise guide to disciplinary actions involving public employees in New York State a 2100+ page e-book. For more information click on http://booklocker.com/books/5215.html

Handbooks focusing on New York State and Municipal Public Personnel Law:

The Discipline Book, - a concise guide to disciplinary actions involving public employees in New York State. A 1900+ page e-book. For more information click on http://booklocker.com/books/5215.html

The Layoff, Preferred List and Reinstatement Manual - a 435 page handbook reviewing the relevant laws, rules and regulations, and selected court and administrative decisions. For more information click on http://booklocker.com/books/5216.html

A Reasonable Disciplinary Penalty Under the Circumstances - A 600+ page guide to penalties imposed on public employees in New York State found guilty of selected acts of misconduct. For more information, click on http://booklocker.com/books/7401.html

General Municipal Law§§ 207-a and 207-c - Disability Leave for fire, police and other public sector personnel - a 1098 page e-book focusing on administering General Municipal Law Sections 207-a/207-c and providing benefits thereunder. For more information click on http://booklocker.com/books/3916.html

Caution:

Subsequent court and administrative rulings, or changes to laws, rules and regulations may have modified or clarified or vacated or reversed the decisions summarized here. Accordingly, these summaries should be Shepardized® or otherwise checked to make certain that the most recent information is being considered by the reader.

THE MATERIAL ON THIS WEBSITE IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY. CHANGES IN LAWS, RULES, REGULATIONS AND NEW COURT AND ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS MAY AFFECT THE ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS LAWBLOG. THE MATERIAL PRESENTED IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE AND THE USE OF ANY MATERIAL POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE DOES NOT CREATE AN ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP.

Consistent with the Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a Committee of the American Bar Association and a Committee of Publishers and Associations, the material in this blog is presented with the understanding that the publisher is not providing legal advice to the reader and in the event legal or other expert assistance is needed, the reader should seek such advice from a competent professional.

Items published in NYPPL may not be used for commercial purposes without prior written permission to copy and distribute such material. Send your request via e-mail to publications@nycap.rr.com

Readers may share material posted in NYPPL with others provided attribution to NYPPL is given.

Copyright© 1987 - 2014 by the Public Employment Law Press.



___________________



N.B. From time to time a political ad or endorsement may appear in the sidebar of this Blog. NYPPL does not have any control over such posting.

_____________________

.