June 12, 2020

A 15-day suspension from employment without pay found reasonable under the circumstances

Supreme Court denied a teacher's [Plaintiff] petition seeking to vacate an arbitration award suspending him for 15 days without pay. The Appellate Division unanimously affirmed the Supreme Court's ruling. 

Citing Lackow v Department of Educ. [or "Board"] of City of N.Y., 51 AD3d 563, the Appellate Division held that the arbitrator's decision has a rational basis and was supported by the evidence. 

The record, said the court, shows that the arbitrator reasonably determined that the Petitioner was guilty of misconduct when he locked a 10-year old student out of the classroom and left him unsupervised in the hallway. 

Even if Petitioner was justified in removing the student from the classroom, said the Appellate Division, his actions in locking the boy out of the room, in a state of distress and leaving him in the hallway without adequate supervision, violated school policy.

The Appellate Division said that imposing a penalty of a 15-day suspension without pay from employment "does not shock our sense of fairness."

The decision is posted on the Internet at:

CAUTION

Subsequent court and administrative rulings, or changes to laws, rules and regulations may have modified or clarified or vacated or reversed the decisions summarized here. Accordingly, these summaries should be Shepardized® or otherwise checked to make certain that the most recent information is being considered by the reader.
THE MATERIAL ON THIS WEBSITE IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY. AGAIN, CHANGES IN LAWS, RULES, REGULATIONS AND NEW COURT AND ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS MAY AFFECT THE ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS LAWBLOG. THE MATERIAL PRESENTED IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE AND THE USE OF ANY MATERIAL POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE DOES NOT CREATE AN ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP.
Consistent with the Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a Committee of the American Bar Association and a Committee of Publishers and Associations, the material in this blog is presented with the understanding that neither the publisher nor members of the staff are providing legal advice to the reader and in the event legal or other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to seek such advice from a competent professional.