ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IS NOT USED, IN WHOLE OR IN PART, IN THE SUMMARIES OF JUDICIAL AND QUASI-JUDICIAL DECISIONS PREPARED BY NYPPL

May 20, 2014

An applicant for a preliminary injunction must satisfy two tests: a showing of irreparable injury if its application is not granted and its probability of success on the merits


An applicant for a preliminary injunction must satisfy two tests: a showing of irreparable injury if its application is not granted and its probability of success on the merits
Patrolmen's Benevolent Assn. of the City of New York, Inc. v City of New York, 2014 NY Slip Op 03464, Appellate Division, First Department

Three members of the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association of the City of New York, Inc. (PBA) were elected to four-year terms as the sole borough-wide PBA representatives for police officers assigned to the Bronx. The three were issued Release Time certificates pursuant to Mayor's Executive Order #75 (3/22/73) (EO 75) which provided the three elected PBA members with full-time leaves with pay and benefits.

A grand jury indicted the three members in connection with an alleged ticket-fixing scheme.* Pursuant to Civil Service Law §75(3-a), the three individuals were suspended without pay for 30 days, after which they were restored to modified duty. In addition the City rescinded their respective Release Time certificates. The PBA, however, declined the City’s offer to issue new Release Time certificates for three other employees of the union's choice, and filed a contract grievance with the City’s Office of Labor Relations.

After the grievance was denied, petitioners filed a demand for arbitration with the New York City Office of Collective Bargaining seeking to have the certificates reinstated on the ground that the rescission violated the parties' collective bargaining agreement and EO #75. In addition, the PBA filed an application in Supreme Court pursuant to CPLR Article 75 seeking a preliminary injunction barring the revocations of the Released Time Certificates pending arbitration.

Supreme Court granted the PBA a preliminary injunction enjoining the City from denying or revoking the "Release Time" certificates to the three PBA members pending resolution of arbitration proceedings.

CPLR §7502(c) provides that the Supreme Court "may entertain an application for ... a preliminary injunction in connection with an arbitration that is pending The party seeking the preliminary injunction must demonstrate a probability of success on the merits, a danger of irreparable injury in the absence of a preliminary injunction preliminary injunction being issued, and a balance of the equities in its favor.

The City appealed. The Appellate Division, Judges Tom and Gische dissenting, vacated the Supreme Court’s preliminary injunction, explaining that the PBA, even assuming that an arbitration award in its favor would be render ineffectual without such provisional relief, failed to establish a likelihood of success on the merits of the claim to be arbitrated.

* The Appellate Division's opinion states “The indictments of the [three members] on charges related to a ticket-fixing scheme ... include allegations of grand larceny, official misconduct, tampering with public records, and criminal solicitation ...."

The decision is posted on the Internet at:
http://www.nycourts.gov/reporter/3dseries/2014/2014_03464.htm

CAUTION

Subsequent court and administrative rulings, or changes to laws, rules and regulations may have modified or clarified or vacated or reversed the decisions summarized here. Accordingly, these summaries should be Shepardized® or otherwise checked to make certain that the most recent information is being considered by the reader.
THE MATERIAL ON THIS WEBSITE IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY. AGAIN, CHANGES IN LAWS, RULES, REGULATIONS AND NEW COURT AND ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS MAY AFFECT THE ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS LAWBLOG. THE MATERIAL PRESENTED IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE AND THE USE OF ANY MATERIAL POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE, OR CORRESPONDENCE CONCERNING SUCH MATERIAL, DOES NOT CREATE AN ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP.
New York Public Personnel Law Blog Editor Harvey Randall served as Principal Attorney, New York State Department of Civil Service; Director of Personnel, SUNY Central Administration; Director of Research, Governor’s Office of Employee Relations; and Staff Judge Advocate General, New York Guard. Consistent with the Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a Committee of the American Bar Association and a Committee of Publishers and Associations, the material posted to this blog is presented with the understanding that neither the publisher nor NYPPL and, or, its staff and contributors are providing legal advice to the reader and in the event legal or other expert assistance is needed, the reader is urged to seek such advice from a knowledgeable professional.
New York Public Personnel Law. Email: publications@nycap.rr.com