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Saturday, May 14, 2011

A series of annual appointments as an educator may not result in tenure by estoppel

A series of annual appointments as an educator may not result in tenure by estoppel
Mohr v Salamanca City School District, 267 A.D.2d 983

Seniority is one of the critical elements in determining the retention of an employee in layoff situations. Such seniority, however, is a function of having tenure with the individual’s employer, as the Mohr case demonstrates. As Mohr demonstrates, tenure is attained as a result of being continued in service after completing a probationary period and not simply completing a series of annual appointments.

Brian Mohr was appointed as a teacher’s aide in Salamanca’s Bilingual Education Program in 1978. He was reappointed annually to that position until 1982 when he was appointed as a Title VII funded Bilingual Resource Teacher [BFT] for one year.

In determining seniority for the purposes of a layoff, the District found that Mohr, the least senior teacher, and he was terminated. Mohr sued, contending that because of his earlier service with the district, he was not the least senior teacher in his tenure area. Mohr argued that he had acquired tenure by estoppel as a teacher as a result of his service with the district from 1987 through and including 1992. He claimed that this entitled him to “bump” a teacher in the Seneca Language/Iroquois Culture tenure area with less seniority or, alternatively, to be placed on the preferred list for employment in “similar positions”.

The Appellate Division said “Supreme Court properly rejected those contentions.”

According to the decision, although an individual who completes his or her probationary period may attain tenure by estoppel, Mohr had not been appointed to a “tenure track” position until 1993. Each of Mohr’s pre-1993 employments by the district was dependent on the district’s receiving grant funds. As Mohr had been employed under a series of one-year contracts rather than for a “probationary term,” the court said that he could not, and did not, attain tenure by estoppel. This meant that Mohr could not “bump” a teacher with less service with the district.

In Yastion v Mills, 229 A.D.2d 775, the Appellate Division held that a teacher may work on a year-to-year contractual basis and never acquire tenure even after three years of service. Orange-Ulster BOCES had appointed Yastion to a federally funded position and his annual employment contracts specifically indicated that “tenure does not apply to this position.”

Mohr was no more successful with his claim that he should be placed on a preferred list. The Appellate Division said that “it is well settled that a teacher is entitled to be placed on a preferred eligible list if he or she is certified in the same or a similar tenure area.”

Pointing out that Mohr was not certified to teach in the Elementary Education or a similar tenure area, the court said that while he held a permit that was the equivalent of certification to teach Seneca Language/Iroquois Culture, “the closest tenure area to Seneca Language/Iroquois Culture is the foreign languages tenure area, which, said the court, applies to seventh grade and above, not to the elementary grades.” Accordingly, the Appellate Division dismissed this branch of his appeal as well, holding that Mohr was not “entitled to placement on a preferred eligibility list.”


Handbooks focusing on State and Municipal Public Personnel Law continue to be available for purchase via the links provided below:

The Discipline Book at http://thedisciplinebook.blogspot.com/

A Reasonable Penalty Under The Circumstances at http://nypplarchives.blogspot.com

The Disability Benefits E-book: at http://section207.blogspot.com/

Layoff, Preferred Lists at http://nylayoff.blogspot.com/

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