December 10, 2010

Exhausting of Taylor Law contract remedies

Exhausting of Taylor Law contract remedies
Kaufmann v Rochester CSD, App. Div., Fourth Dept., 275 AD2d 890

The Rochester Board of Education attempted to have Susan K. Kaufmann’s lawsuit dismissed on the theory that Kaufmann had not exhausted her administrative remedies because she did not file a contract grievance concerning her complaint.

The Appellate Division, Fourth Department, quickly disposed of the district’s argument by pointing out that Kaufmann did not allege that the district had violated her rights under the collective bargaining agreement but rather she alleged that the district had violated her rights under Section 2585(2) of the Education Law.

Accordingly, said the court, Kaufmann was not required to file a grievance under the collective bargaining agreement concerning her complaint.

Education Law Section 2585(2) addresses situations involving the abolishment of one position and the creation of another position having similar duties and provides that the individual encumbering the abolished position shall be appointed to the office or position thus created without reduction in salary or increment, provided the record of such person has been of faithful, competent service in the office or position he has filled.
NYPPL

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