Best Lawblog Contest for 2017 now being conducted by The Legal Institute

From now until
September 15th, 2017, Lawblog fans can nominate their favorite blogs and bloggers for inclusion in the voting round of 2017. As in previous years, the nomination process is competitive, meaning the more nominations a blog receives, the more likely it is to be included in the public voting stage of the contest.

To access the link to the nomination form, click on:

https://www.theexpertinstitute.com/blog-contest/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=CTA&utm_campaign=blog-contest-8.14.2017-general

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Employee terminated for deficient performance


Employee terminated for deficient performance
2013 NY Slip Op 08012, Appellate Division, First Department

The Appellate Division confirmed the ruling of the State of New York Industrial Board of Appeals (IBA) which, after a hearing, determined that New York State Department of Labor (DOL) acted reasonably in concluding that the New York City Board of Education (BOE) did not terminate an individual's [Petitioner] employment in retaliation for his submitting complaints about health and safety pursuant to the Public Employee Safety and Health Act. *

The court said that substantial evidence in the record supports IBA's determination that DOL acted reasonably in concluding that Petitioner's complaints regarding health and safety were not a motivating factor in his dismissal from his position as a “Homebound Program”** teacher.

Although there is evidence that Petitioner's supervisor “purportedly told a DOL investigator in 1993 that [Petitioner] was terminated from his position because he made health and safety complaints,” the Appellate Division said that the evidence underlying DOL's conclusion that BOE did not terminate Petitioner because of his filing complaints pursuant to the Pubic Employee Safety and Health Act included extensive evidence of deficient performance by Petitioner.

The Appellate Division also noted that the supervisor who allegedly indicated a discriminatory motive was not the ultimate decision-maker, and the record shows that BOE immediately offered Petitioner another tenured track position after terminating his employment in the Homebound Program.

The court commented that the same result would obtain whether the matter was analyzed pursuant to the traditional framework set forth in McDonnell Douglas Corp. v Green, 411 US 792, or under a "mixed motive" analysis, citing Melman v Montefiore Medical Center, 93 AD3d 107.

* New York State Labor Law §27-a, “Safety and health standards for public employees”

** Homebound instruction - A resident of the public school district enrolled in a public or nonpublic school is eligible for this service if qualified. Home instruction is a form of tutorial services, provided to public or nonpublic students, by the public school district of residence.  These services are provided in accordance with the Commissioner of Education's Regulations [see 8 NYCRR 175.21] to students who are unable to attend their public or nonpublic school because of physical, mental, or emotional illness or injury.

The decision is posted on the Internet at:
.

Handbooks focusing on State and Municipal Public Personnel Law continue to be available for purchase via the links provided below:

The Discipline Book at http://thedisciplinebook.blogspot.com/

A Reasonable Penalty Under The Circumstances at http://nypplarchives.blogspot.com

The Disability Benefits E-book: at http://section207.blogspot.com/

Layoff, Preferred Lists at http://nylayoff.blogspot.com/

Caution:

Subsequent court and administrative rulings, or changes to laws, rules and regulations may have modified or clarified or vacated or reversed the decisions summarized here. Accordingly, these summaries should be Shepardized® or otherwise checked to make certain that the most recent information is being considered by the reader.

THE MATERIAL ON THIS WEBSITE IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY. CHANGES IN LAWS, RULES, REGULATIONS AND NEW COURT AND ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS MAY AFFECT THE ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS LAWBLOG. THE MATERIAL PRESENTED IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE AND THE USE OF ANY MATERIAL POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE DOES NOT CREATE AN ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP.

Consistent with the Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a Committee of the American Bar Association and a Committee of Publishers and Associations, the material in this blog is presented with the understanding that the publisher is not providing legal advice to the reader and in the event legal or other expert assistance is needed, the reader should seek such advice from a competent professional.

Items published in NYPPL may not be used for commercial purposes without prior written permission to copy and distribute such material. Send your request via e-mail to publications@nycap.rr.com

Copyright© 1987 - 2017 by the Public Employment Law Press.



___________________



N.B. From time to time a political ad or endorsement may appear in the sidebar of this Blog. NYPPL does not have any control over such posting.

_____________________

.