Best Lawblog Contest for 2017 now being conducted by The Legal Institute

From now until
September 15th, 2017, Lawblog fans can nominate their favorite blogs and bloggers for inclusion in the voting round of 2017. As in previous years, the nomination process is competitive, meaning the more nominations a blog receives, the more likely it is to be included in the public voting stage of the contest.

To access the link to the nomination form, click on:

https://www.theexpertinstitute.com/blog-contest/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=CTA&utm_campaign=blog-contest-8.14.2017-general

Friday, July 11, 2014

Recent decisions by OATH Administrative Law Judges



Recent decisions by OATH Administrative Law Judges
Source:  New York City Office of Administrative Trials And Hearings

Physical altercations: A special officer was charged with engaging in an off-duty fight with a co-worker, making harassing phone calls to that co-worker, and striking a handcuffed homeless shelter resident in the face. ALJ Kevin F. Casey found that respondent was a willing participant in a fight with a co-worker at an off-duty event where many current and former agency employees were present. He recommended dismissal of the harassment charge because the Department did not prove that harassing phone calls were made or that special officer was the caller. As for the charge that the officer hit a resident, ALJ Casey found the testimony from the employer’s witness that he saw the officer strike a seated resident with a closed fist, more credible than the employee's claim that she pushed the resident after he charged at her with a head-butt motion. For the misconduct proven, ALJ Casey recommended a 60-day suspension. Dep't of Homeless Services v. Smith, OATH Index No. 518/14.

Excessive Absences: A computer programmer analyst was charged with misconduct, incompetence, and leaving her work station early on at least 165 occasions. ALJ Ingrid M. Addison found that the Agency condoned respondent’s practice of scanning out at 4:53 p.m., and recommended dismissal of that charge, but she sustained the charge that on each occasion that she scanned out at 4:53 p.m., respondent left her work station without authorization at least 18 minutes prior, in order to scan out on a different floor. ALJ Addison found that petitioner proved that respondent is incapable of performing the duties of her title. Although the Agency sought termination of respondent's employment, ALJ Addison found that petitioner must assume some responsibility for its failure to evaluate and assess respondent’s qualifications before assigning her to her position. She recommended demotion of respondent to her previous title. Financial Information Services Agency v. Leung, OATH Index No. 2115/13.

Failure to perform duties: A correction officer was found to have been excessively absent for missing 198 days of work in a nine-month period. Although the employee provided valid documentation for her continued absence, she still may be disciplined for failure to perform the duties of her position because of excessive absence. The employee was also found to have disobeyed orders on two occasions and to having filed a false report. Based on the high number of absences and the other misconduct proven, ALJ Alessandra F. Zorgniotti recommended the officer's termination from employment. Dep't of Correction v. Vives, OATH Index Nos. 1162/14, 1163/14 & 1164/14.

Leaving training class early: ALJ Faye Lewis found that an assistant civil engineer committed misconduct by leaving a training class early without authorization and by failing to participate in the class and instead reviewed other work material. The ALJ recommended the employee be suspended without pay for two days, finding that the Agency's proof failed to establish that employee was disruptive in class or that he committed misconduct because he had absented himself from class for two hours to attend a scheduled meeting with a supervisor. Dep't of Environmental Protection v. Frenzel, OATH Index No. 611/14.

____________________


A Reasonable Disciplinary Penalty Under the Circumstances - a 442-page volume focusing on determining an appropriate disciplinary penalty to be imposed on an employee in the public service in instances where the employee has been found guilty of misconduct or incompetence. Now available in two formats - as a large, paperback print edition, and as an e-book. For more information click on http://booklocker.com/books/7401.html
____________________
 
.

Handbooks focusing on State and Municipal Public Personnel Law continue to be available for purchase via the links provided below:

The Discipline Book at http://thedisciplinebook.blogspot.com/

A Reasonable Penalty Under The Circumstances at http://nypplarchives.blogspot.com

The Disability Benefits E-book: at http://section207.blogspot.com/

Layoff, Preferred Lists at http://nylayoff.blogspot.com/

Caution:

Subsequent court and administrative rulings, or changes to laws, rules and regulations may have modified or clarified or vacated or reversed the decisions summarized here. Accordingly, these summaries should be Shepardized® or otherwise checked to make certain that the most recent information is being considered by the reader.

THE MATERIAL ON THIS WEBSITE IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY. CHANGES IN LAWS, RULES, REGULATIONS AND NEW COURT AND ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS MAY AFFECT THE ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS LAWBLOG. THE MATERIAL PRESENTED IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE AND THE USE OF ANY MATERIAL POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE DOES NOT CREATE AN ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP.

Consistent with the Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a Committee of the American Bar Association and a Committee of Publishers and Associations, the material in this blog is presented with the understanding that the publisher is not providing legal advice to the reader and in the event legal or other expert assistance is needed, the reader should seek such advice from a competent professional.

Items published in NYPPL may not be used for commercial purposes without prior written permission to copy and distribute such material. Send your request via e-mail to publications@nycap.rr.com

Copyright© 1987 - 2017 by the Public Employment Law Press.



___________________



N.B. From time to time a political ad or endorsement may appear in the sidebar of this Blog. NYPPL does not have any control over such posting.

_____________________

.