ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IS NOT USED, IN WHOLE OR IN PART, IN THE SUMMARIES OF JUDICIAL AND QUASI-JUDICIAL DECISIONS PREPARED BY NYPPL

November 15, 2011

Limitations on sick leave


Limitations on sick leave
Economico v. Village of Pelham, 50 NY2d 120

Notwithstanding a contract provision providing for “unlimited sick leave with pay” for police officers unable to work due to non-service related disabilities, the State Court of Appeals held that a police officer so disabled could be terminated pursuant to Section 73 of the Civil Service Law. The Court distinguished this case (Economico v. Village of Pelham) from the Yonkers teacher case (Matter of Board of Educ. v Yonkers Fedn. of Teachers, 40 NY2d 268) where the Court held there was no prohibition against the establishment of a limited job security clause in a collective bargaining agreement.

The State’s interest in maintaining the efficiency and continuity of its civil service was held a substantial one and Section 73 limits the employee’s right to be continued on the payroll without limitation if triggered by the sound discretion of the appointing authority, even in the face of a contract provision to the contrary. The Court, in another case decided the same day (Dolan v. Whalen) held that a hearing in connection with termination pursuant to Section 73 is required if there is “some factual dispute impacting upon the employer’s right to discharge” the employee.

Of course the police officer injured in the line of duty is entitled to unlimited sick leave under the General Municipal Law, Sections 207-c(1), which leave is at full salary until the disability ceases. In this latter case, the employee cannot be required to use any leave credits available to him (Op. St. Comp. 79-356). The Comptroller’s Opinion noted that “a municipality and its policemen may not agree through collective bargaining that a policeman injured in the performance of his duties apply accumulated sick leave or vacation credits to receive the full amount of his salary during the period of his disability.”

CAUTION

Subsequent court and administrative rulings, or changes to laws, rules and regulations may have modified or clarified or vacated or reversed the decisions summarized here. Accordingly, these summaries should be Shepardized® or otherwise checked to make certain that the most recent information is being considered by the reader.
THE MATERIAL ON THIS WEBSITE IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY. AGAIN, CHANGES IN LAWS, RULES, REGULATIONS AND NEW COURT AND ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS MAY AFFECT THE ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS LAWBLOG. THE MATERIAL PRESENTED IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE AND THE USE OF ANY MATERIAL POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE, OR CORRESPONDENCE CONCERNING SUCH MATERIAL, DOES NOT CREATE AN ATTORNEY-CLIENT RELATIONSHIP.
New York Public Personnel Law Blog Editor Harvey Randall served as Principal Attorney, New York State Department of Civil Service; Director of Personnel, SUNY Central Administration; Director of Research, Governor’s Office of Employee Relations; and Staff Judge Advocate General, New York Guard. Consistent with the Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a Committee of the American Bar Association and a Committee of Publishers and Associations, the material posted to this blog is presented with the understanding that neither the publisher nor NYPPL and, or, its staff and contributors are providing legal advice to the reader and in the event legal or other expert assistance is needed, the reader is urged to seek such advice from a knowledgeable professional.
New York Public Personnel Law. Email: publications@nycap.rr.com