February 25, 2018

Employer advanced good faith reasons supporting its decision to terminate a probationary employee

Employer advanced good faith reasons supporting its decision to terminate a probationary employee
Cooper v City of New York, 2018 NY Slip Op 01240, Appellate Division, First Department

Supreme Court annulled the New York City Department of Education's determination terminating probationary employee John Cooper's from his position. The Appellate Division reversed the lower court's ruling "on the law."

The Appellate Division held that Cooper failed to establish that he was terminated in bad faith in view of the record demonstrating that his performance during his probationary period was unsatisfactory.

On the contrary, said the court, "the record demonstrates that [the New York City Department of Education] had a good faith reason for its determination" in that there were issues with Cooper's leadership, communication, and project management skills, which not resolved despite Cooper's supervisor's repeated advice that he needed to improve and her efforts to assist him.

The decision is posted on the Internet at:

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