November 30, 2018

Employee's termination recommended after being found guilty of multiple charges and specifications


Employee's termination recommended after being found guilty of multiple charges and specifications

A computer associate employed by the New York City Department of Transportation was charged with multiple act of misconduct.

OATH Administrative Law Judge Ingrid M. Addison found the employee guilty of charges and specifications alleging the employee's:

● Being late and absent without leave on numerous occasions;

● Sleeping and lounging on the job on at least 10 occasions;

● Failing to promptly perform her assigned tasks on two occasions;

● Failing to comply with her supervisor’s directive to attend a training session;

● Being on social media on the job via the use of the office computer;

● Becoming loud and disruptive to her supervisor;

● Using Agency’s e-mail system to send abusive e-mails to recipients mainly comprised of her supervisors and directors;

● Sending false information about her director via e-mail which she copied to another New York City agency; and

● Failing to notify her supervisor, the office of labor relations, and the department of investigations that she had been arrested.

Judge Addison recommended that the Department impose the penalty of termination in view of the multitude acts of misconduct for which the employee had been found guilty.





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